Simple definition of radiocarbon dating

Radiocarbon decays slowly in a living organism, and the amount lost is continually replenished as long as the organism takes in air or food.Once the organism dies, however, it ceases to absorb carbon-14, so that the amount of the radiocarbon in its tissues steadily decreases.As soon as it dies, however, the C ration gets smaller.In other words, we have a ‘clock’ which starts ticking at the moment something dies.As a result it is always undergoing natural radioactive decay while the abundances of the other isotopes are unchanged.

Radiocarbon dating has transformed our understanding of the past 50,000 years.One-star words are frequent, two-star words are more frequent, and three-star words are the most frequent.The thesaurus of synonyms and related words is fully integrated into the dictionary.by Dr Carl Wieland An attempt to explain this very important method of dating and the way in which, when fully understood, it supports a ‘short’ timescale.In fact, the whole method is a giant ‘clock’ which seems to put a very young upper limit on the age of the atmosphere.